Screw the Deficit

The bond market vigilantes, the group that according to legend forced Washington in the 1990s to turn its attention to reducing the deficit and whose return has been predicted ever since the red ink came back with a vengeance during the George W. Bush administration, will likely make it’s long-anticipated re-appearance in the next few weeks as Wall Street and the budget world turn their attention to the soon-to-be-needed increase in the federal debt ceiling.

Except that the bond market vigilantes are likely to be saying some thing completely different from what deficit hawks have been expecting. Instead of doing what they did before by demanding deficit reductions, today’s bond market vigilantes are far more likely to be insisting that the federal debt ceiling be raised whether or not the spending cuts and revenue increases some are saying is the precondition for their vote ever materialize.

In other words, screw the deficit.

This isn’t surprising: The bond market is the one that stands to lose the most if the debt ceiling isn’t raised as soon as possible after the government’s current borrowing limit is reached in the next few weeks. Traders and investors will have their revenues negatively affected by delays or outright cancellations of Treasury auctions and the rising interest rates that are generally assumed will result if that happens.

Given a choice between delaying a debt ceiling increase until a deficit reduction plan is in place or moving ahead now and dealing with the deficit later, the bond market vigilantes will quickly choose the later. They also are likely to readily agree to a new deficit process that projects reductions in the future rather than actual spending and revenue changes if that’s what it takes to get the debt ceiling increase in place sooner.

About Stan Collender 126 Articles

Affiliation: Qorvis Communications

Stan Collender is a former New Yorker who, after getting a degree from the University of California, Berkeley, moved to Washington to get it out of his system. That was more than 30 years ago.

During most of his career, Collender has worked on the federal budget and congressional budget process, including stints on the staff of the House and Senate Budget Committees; founding the Federal Budget Report, a newsletter that was published for almost two decades; and for the past 11 years writing a weekly column for and now

He is currently a managing director for Qorvis Communications, where he spends most of his time working with and for financial services clients.

Visit: Capital Gains and Games

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.