How Will We Pay for the Health Care Plan? (Part III)

Last week I published two posts expressing concern about how Congress might pay for proposed health reforms. The first post argued that policymakers should focus on the trajectory of new spending and offsets, not just the cumulative 10-year budget scores. The second post expressed concern that the offsets used to pay for health reform may include policies that otherwise would have been used to reduce our out-of-control deficits; as a result health reform that appears to be “paid for” could nonetheless worsen our long-run budget trajectory.

Needless to say, these issues are receiving lots of attention around the budgeting parts of the Web. Some important contributions include:

  • Over at the eponymous, Keith Hennessey points out something I missed. In a Financial Times piece on June 22, OMB Director Peter Orszag suggested that paying for health reform over a 10-year budget window isn’t enough for budget neutrality. That’s exactly the point I made in my first post. Peter then sets out a second requirement: that health care reform must be “deficit neutral in the 10th year alone.” This is a good step, since it would rule out some trajectories of spending that would obviously worsen the long-run deficit. As Keith points out, this requirement isn’t sufficient by itself: you need to worry about the entire trajectory of spending and offsets, not just a single year. Nonetheless, it is a very good sign that the Administration is pointing out the limitations of 10-year budget scores.
  • The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget is publishing a series of papers on paying for health reform. Their June 18 release includes a quite comprehensive list of potential policy changes that could be used as health “pay fors.“
About Donald Marron 294 Articles

Donald Marron is an economist in the Washington, DC area. He currently speaks, writes, and consults about economic, budget, and financial issues.

From 2002 to early 2009, he served in various senior positions in the White House and Congress including: * Member of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers (CEA) * Acting Director of the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) * Executive Director of Congress’s Joint Economic Committee (JEC)

Before his government service, Donald had a varied career as a professor, consultant, and entrepreneur. In the mid-1990s, he taught economics and finance at the University of Chicago Graduate School of Business. He then spent about a year-and-a-half managing large antitrust cases (e.g., Pepsi vs. Coke) at Charles River Associates in Washington, DC. After that, he took the plunge into the world of new ventures, serving as Chief Financial Officer of a health care software start-up in Austin, TX. After that fascinating experience, he started his career in public service.

Donald received his Ph.D. in Economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his B.A. in Mathematics a couple miles down the road at Harvard.

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