Stop the Lies. Stop the Liars.

Real long term success and greatness are founded upon the principles that people do not lie, cheat, or steal. Our nation is neither succeeding nor is great at this point in time because we have allowed these vices to grow and spread throughout our society. Shame on us.

Our nation does have the potential to be a fabulous nation again; however, let’s stop kidding ourselves in thinking that we are a great nation currently. How is it that America has lost its greatness? Where are the aforementioned vices on display?

  1. Great nations do not allow themselves to wallow in debt in the manner that we have.
  2. Great nations do not allow themselves to plummet in educational standards and rankings in the manner that we have.
  3. Great nations do not allow “regulatory capture” to propagate thoughout the financial industry in the manner that we have.
  4. Great nations do not allow political systems to get corrupted by the big money of industry lobbyists in the manner that we have.
  5. Great nations do not allow a polarization in political and economic standing in the manner that we have.
  6. Great nations do not lack real statesmen who can evoke our best spirits and lead us to greatness. Who in our nation are real statesmen? Who?

I believe the crisis situation playing out currently in the state of Wisconsin is merely a harbinger of things to come across many of our states. The Wisconsin display may be an indication of problems we face in our future but, in my opinion, it is much more a reflection of the bubbling up of the failed policies and programs we have buried in our past. The burying occurred as a result of formal and informal lying, cheating, and stealing.

Great nations and great people do not bury their problems. They confront them.

Please do not think I am not eternally optimistic about the potential for true greatness for our nation and for each individual citizen within the United States. That said, if we think we will regain our greatness while maintaining so many of the same programs of the past, we are sadly mistaken.

Shared sacrifice is the order of the day. Why so? Look at the report card provided in today’s New York Times by Charles Blow who writes – Empire at the End of Decadence:

It’s time for us to stop lying to ourselves about this country.

America is great in many ways, but on a whole host of measures — some of which are shown in the accompanying chart — we have become the laggards of the industrialized world. Not only are we not No. 1 — “U.S.A.! U.S.A.!” — we are among the worst of the worst.

Yet this reality and the urgency that it ushers in is too hard for many Americans to digest. They would prefer to continue to bathe in platitudes about America’s greatness, to view our eroding empire through the gauzy vapors of past grandeur.

Numbers do not lie.

What is America’s future? We will only have a future if we confront our reality and stop lying about our past. We will only have a future if we expose those who propagate and profit from the lies. Why are our educational rankings so poor? Why are our prison populations so high? Why are our economic rankings so mediocre? Why do so few people trust those in Washington? We allow the lies covering these failures to flourish.

What do you want to do? Spread this message. Stop the lies. Stop the liars.

About Larry Doyle 522 Articles

Larry Doyle embarked on his Wall Street career in 1983 as a mortgage-backed securities trader for The First Boston Corporation. He was involved in the growth and development of the secondary mortgage market from its near infancy.

After close to 7 years at First Boston, Larry joined Bear Stearns in early 1990 as a mortgage trader. In 1993, Larry was named a Senior Managing Director at the firm. He left Bear to join Union Bank of Switzerland in late 1996 as Head of Mortgage Trading.

In 1998, after 15 years of trading and precipitated by Swiss Bank’s takeover of UBS, Larry moved from trading to sales as a senior salesperson at Bank of America. His move into sales led him to the role as National Sales Manager for Securitized Products at JP Morgan Chase in 2000. He was integrally involved in developing the department, hiring 40 salespeople, and generating $300 million in sales revenue. He left JP Morgan in 2006.

Throughout his career, Larry eagerly engaged clients and colleagues. He has mentored dozens of junior colleagues, recruited at a number of colleges and universities, and interviewed hundreds. He has also had extensive public speaking experience. Additionally, Larry served as Chair of the Mortgage Trading Committee for the Public Securities Association (PSA) in the mid-90s.

Larry graduated Cum Laude, Phi Beta Kappa in 1983 from the College of the Holy Cross.

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