What’s the Market Telling Us?

In the face of generally positive economic news the last two days, (Retail Sales this morning rose 1.3% and the improving Trade Deficit), the price action in the market is very interesting. What is it telling us? Let’s navigate.

With the U.S. Dollar Index having firmed over the last week, money does not appear to be coming out of the equity markets. The major equity averages are up anywhere from .5 to 2.5% on the month. What market segments are feeling the bulk of the pain? Government bonds and commodities, primarily oil and gold.

Interest rates on U.S. government bonds have continued to move higher as Treasury supply this week has not been well received. With rates on 10yr U.S. Treasurys higher by .35% over the last ten days, it would appear that market participants continue to believe the Fed will be forced to raise rates or make other moves to lessen the support and stimulus provided to the economy.

If rates are to move higher, our dollar should find support  . . . and it is, as the U.S. Dollar Index remains above the 76.00 level. While dollar strength had been a harbinger of general weakness across almost all risk-based asset classes, the commodity sector is bearing the brunt of the pain currently.

The DJ-UBS Commodity Index has declined by 2.5% on the month led lower primarily by oil (down approximately 10% on the month) and gold (down 4% on the month).

Add it all up and what does it mean? If our domestic economy is in fact stabilizing, then the public at large and investors will compel the Grand Old Man, that is Uncle Sam, to back away from continuing to provide stimulus. As that occurs, the market may begin to normalize to levels at which private investors care to put money to work. At this juncture, investors are saying interest rates are not attractive at current levels. As interest rates rise, that may actually temper an economic rebound, especially in housing.

So be it. It is not realistic for market participants “to have their cake and eat it too.”

About Larry Doyle 522 Articles

Larry Doyle embarked on his Wall Street career in 1983 as a mortgage-backed securities trader for The First Boston Corporation. He was involved in the growth and development of the secondary mortgage market from its near infancy.

After close to 7 years at First Boston, Larry joined Bear Stearns in early 1990 as a mortgage trader. In 1993, Larry was named a Senior Managing Director at the firm. He left Bear to join Union Bank of Switzerland in late 1996 as Head of Mortgage Trading.

In 1998, after 15 years of trading and precipitated by Swiss Bank’s takeover of UBS, Larry moved from trading to sales as a senior salesperson at Bank of America. His move into sales led him to the role as National Sales Manager for Securitized Products at JP Morgan Chase in 2000. He was integrally involved in developing the department, hiring 40 salespeople, and generating $300 million in sales revenue. He left JP Morgan in 2006.

Throughout his career, Larry eagerly engaged clients and colleagues. He has mentored dozens of junior colleagues, recruited at a number of colleges and universities, and interviewed hundreds. He has also had extensive public speaking experience. Additionally, Larry served as Chair of the Mortgage Trading Committee for the Public Securities Association (PSA) in the mid-90s.

Larry graduated Cum Laude, Phi Beta Kappa in 1983 from the College of the Holy Cross.

Visit: Sense On Cents

1 Comment on What’s the Market Telling Us?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*